Archives for posts with tag: PE10
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Given the increased volatility in markets, I thought I’d share some thoughts on the current state of the market. Note that this isn’t a forecast nor does it constitute advice to buy or sell any securities.

Positives

The STI’s PE10 (data here) is 12.2x which is pretty much the same as it’s PE (12.21x). That translates to an earnings yield above 8% which in my opinion, is pretty attractive.

If you’re wondering how this stacks up the past, the PE10 isn’t dirt-cheap. It was cheaper during the depths of the GFC in early 2009 and also once more in early 2016. However, it is cheaper than it was in 2013- early 2015 and cheaper than during the run up to the GFC in 2006-2007.

Also, 10-year bond yield have fallen really low. The SGS 10-year bond yield is currently 1.735% which means that spreads between the STI and 10-year bond have reached 6.46% which is some of the highest spreads I’ve seen since I’ve started tracking the STI PE10 vs. the SGS 10-year bond yield.

Negatives

From a psychological/technical standpoint, markets are not down in the dumps. The 50-day SMA is still above the 200-day SMA and prices have not fallen all that much (only roughly 14% from its May 2018 peak and 9% from its late April 2019 peak). Also, with the August close, the monthly STI has now closed below the 10 period MA which is Meb Faber’s momentum signal to get out of the market.

Plus, let’s not forget that the Trade War isn’t going anytime soon even though, as of late August, it seems like Xi and Trump are trying to kiss and make up.

Trump faces re-election next year and if he’s playing to win, then it’s likely he’ll find some foreign powers to blame for America’s real or perceived woes. And we know that his go-to guys to blame for America’s woes are those that have huge trade surpluses with the U.S., namely, Mexico and China.

Also, a no-deal Brexit is also looming in October and with Boris Johnson in charge, it’s less likely there will be any sort of deal that can be reached and will tensions between Japan and Korea get worse? And who knows how the situation in Hong Kong will turn out?

Only time will tell.

Overall

I’m near-term negative but long-term positive because geopolitics and economic sentiment is bad but valuations are starting to look attractive. Of course, if you’re a DCA sort of person, then all of the above shouldn’t matter to you.

Updated the STI PE10 stats.

airport bank board business

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

As of 1 Dec 2018, the STI closed at 3,117.61 with a PE of 11.53x. That gives it a PE10 of 12.6x or if you prefer, a ten-year average earnings yield of 7.94%. On this basis, markets haven’t been this cheap since early 2017.

In fact, the STI was cheaper just a weak ago which shows us how fast sentiments can change. The STI would have been cheaper still if we go back to late October where it briefly dropped below the 3,000 mark.

Over in U.S markets, November was probably a horrid month for most investors. Major drops in the Dow, S&P, Oil and even Bitcoin marked a month where the only refuge was in cash.

 

 

 

Sorry for the late notice but the PE10 has been updated.

airport bank board business

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Following the selloff in the last week of October, the PE10 reached lows that we haven’t seen since early 2017. At a PE10 of 12.2x, that translates into a 10-year earnings yield of slightly over 8%.

It’s cheap but it certainly isn’t dirt cheap. Dirt cheap would be when the PE10 is hovering around 10x average 10-year earnings. That would mean that the STI would be at levels of around 2500 or so.

Having said that, there’s no guarantee that the STI will fall to those levels. The market has run up a bit since I took the reading so who knows where we’re headed. What I’m confident enough to say is: based on what we’re seeing in the market, we’re certainly close to cheap than expensive.

Updated one day late! (check the stats out here)
But still representative of the overall picture of the markets.

Markets have climbed a little in the last week of September. I’m lucky that I stuck to my plan and committed some capital to the STI ETF a couple weeks back.

Anyway, Q3 is over and we’re heading into Q4. Sentiments are kinda pessimistic around the world with all the trade spats going on but markets don’t seem to care that much.

 

airport bank board business

LOL. I didn’t mean to choose a pic of such an exotic exchange.

 

We’re heading deep into the 3rd quarter of the year. The STI’s been largely directionless while U.S. markets have continued to hit new highs. Nothing surprising here as markets outside of the U.S have been weak since the start of the year. It also reminds me of a post by Ben Carlson on how U.S. markets and World Markets don’t exactly have a one-to-one correlation. In fact, the correlation can sometimes be negative. A good reminder of why we need to be diversified beyond our home markets.

Having said that, it does mean that other markets are cheap relative to the U.S. If that’s the case, then where should you put your money?

I think the answer’s fairly obvious.

Check out the PE10 stats here.

Following a reader’s comments on the STI PE10 data, I’ve decided to make it available for download. If you go to the site, you’ll now notice that I’ve added a “Download Data” button in the ‘Background’ section.

dwnloadData.JPG

Have fun with the PE10 data. It’s something I’ve compiled every month for the last 5-6 (?) years.

There are five pieces of data in the file:

(1) the STI close,
(2) the PE  ratio,
(3) the date,
(4) the implied earnings, and
(5) the average 10-year earnings.

(1), (2) and (3) are self-explanatory. You may find some discrepancies with actual data as there were certain months that I failed to update the data in time and therefore had to extrapolate the data, or I updated a day or two later than I was supposed to. However, for all intents and purposes, it should reflect the PE10 fairly accurately.

(4) and (5) are calculated based on (1) and (2). In order to get an average of the past 10 years’ earnings, I need the current earnings. This is where the “implied earnings” is easily calculated by taking (2) divided by (1). With (4), you can then calculate (5). The PE10 which is not in the file is then simply (1) divided by (5).

Some people may prefer to use an exponential moving average of 10-year earnings or you want to adjust earnings for inflation like Shiller does. Feel free to use the data as long as it’s not for commercial purposes.

If you find anything wrong with it, feel free to let me know.

 

 

STIpe10ScreenCap

It’s not much but I’m proud to say that it works and I made it from scratch (with a lot of dependencies and googling)

 

Finally, I got down to creating a page for the Straits Times Index’s PE10. Right now, it’s very simple. it just displays the latest month’s PE10 as well as the historical average and median values.

I’ve picked up coding for some years now but my progress was and still is, slow. However, it looks like I learned enough python and javascript to create a page where I can share the STI’s PE10. The page will be updated monthly.

What I did is really hacky because:

  1. I have to manually key in the STI closing price and PE.
  2. Run a python script locally to process the latest entry, calculate the PE10 and output to a json file.
  3. Upload the json file to the server for the page to retrieve the data, do some calculations for the average & median, and display it.

At some point, I hope to add a chart to the page so you can track how the PE10 has changed over the years and the subsequent capital gains based on a certain year’s PE10 ratio.

You can check out the page here or from the list of resources on my blog.

If you have any tips on how I can improve the page, please let me know in the comments below.

STI Close: 3,529.82
PE10: 14.38x

The run-up in the STI has really caused valuations to jump quite a bit. With the PE10 at 14.38x, the earnings yield is now below 7%. Furthermore, a spike in the 10-yr bond means that difference in yield between the PE10 and 10-yr Singapore Bond has fallen significantly below 5% for the first time since August 2015.

Given the pullback in US and EU markets on Friday, I suspect we’ll see a much weaker STI on Monday. Anyway, at this level, things aren’t looking attractive. I’ll consider loading up on more equities if the STI goes down to 3,200 or less.

Meanwhile, sit tight and hang on for the ride!

STI close: 2846.37
PE10: 11.8x

So the big news affecting the markets was the Brexit (UK’s exit from the EU) and that really hit markets on Friday when the results of the referendum were released. I was overseas but had Wifi and saw  markets in Asia get hit with some huge downs like Japan down 7 or so percent. The pound also took a huge hit and European markets all felt the effects of the vote. No surprise that when US markets opened that night, they were hit as well.

What was surprising was the speed of the recovery. The STI wasn’t really down much and from Tuesday (28th June) began a modest recovery. I was really anticipating further hits to the market (or maybe they have yet to come) and added very small positions.

The main point is, if I was away till yesterday or today and didn’t have access to the market, the whole impact of the Brexit wouldn’t have been felt at all! Overall, my portfolios have been doing nicely despite the horrendous start to the year and much credit goes to my investment plan.

Half the year’s over. How’s your portfolio doing?

We’re coming to the end of the year and markets haven’t been nice to most investors this year. Anyhow, there’s still one more month till the end of the year and the PE10 says that markets are cheap.

Market Close: 2883.64
PE10: 12.05x

Notables include the fact that PE10 earnings have stopped trending upwards which means that actual earnings are coming in low and pulling the average down. Also notable is the fact that this is the longest streak (in months) that PE10s have remained low* since the GFC (in late ’08/early ’09). This latest streak has the PE10 at the lowest decile for 4 months (including this latest update) while the GFC streak was at 7 months.

Will this streak surpass the previous one? Only time will tell.

*On my spreadsheet, I have the monthly PE10s sorted into deciles.