July’s almost over! Here are some reads to make your week better.

 

Canada’s Secret to Escaping the ‘Liberal Doom Loop’ (The Atlantic)

Ah, Canada. We visited the Niagara Falls area, Toronto, Montreal and Quebec on our honeymoon and I have very good memories of the country.

The article provides a commentary on Canada’s much greater propensity to accept migrants. A nice overview of Canadian history as well as their approach towards multi-culturalism.

Singapore is also supposed to be a melting pot of cultures but I’m too sure about whether we’ve become more or less accepting of immigrants over time. I suspect we’ve become less welcoming towards migrants over time.

Maybe we need to take a leaf from Canada’s playbook on this.

 

Understanding The Yield Curve: A Prescient Economic Predictor (Financial Samurai)

The Flattening (The Irrelevant Investor)

These ones are for the economics/investing crowd.

Of late, the yield curve has been brought up a lot. This was one of those things that I struggled to understand in university but now that you know it, it’s so trivial.

Read Financial Samurai’s piece for a primer on what an inverted yield curve shows us and read Michael Batnick’s piece for some analysis done on yield curves. What’s particularly instructive is the chart from oddstats about how the S&P500 was up anywhere from 20-70% in the 500 days following where the yield curve is now.

Unfortunately, 500 days is a long time and I suspect that many people will not be able to live with the drawdown that comes with a recession. As always, you can’t react to things when a recession or a bear market comes, you already need a plan before these things happen.

 

The topsy turvy logic of Trump’s trade tirades (Tim Harford)

One more for the econ crowd. Tim Harford always makes current economic affairs so simple to understand. If I read his books while I was in junior college, I might not have been so bad at economics.

Anyway, go read his piece to realise how stupid Trump is with his war on trade.

The same is true for Mr Trump’s new steel and aluminium tariffs. Ostensibly an attack on perfidious foreigners, the tariffs hurt any American who directly or indirectly uses steel or aluminium, all 327m of them. And by obstructing US imports they obstruct US exports, too.

And also some American’s obsession with the trade deficit:

There is the US trade deficit. This is the result of the world’s insatiable desire to invest in US assets, coupled with the American consumer’s preference to spend rather than save. It has little to do with tariffs on milk powder or anything else.

 

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