Light selection this week because I was reading the very good Atomic Habits by James Clear as well as a few articles on value traps in stock selection (more on these in the weeks to come).

books on bookshelves

Photo by Mikes Photos on Pexels.com

November Macro Update: New Employment Among Highest Since 2000 (The Fat Pitch)

A collection of statistics on the U.S. economic situation. Key points being that the U.S. economy is still going strong and therefore we can look forward to more rate hikes in the not-so-near future. The Fed didn’t raise rates in November but they are still expected to raise rates once more in December and three times next year.

Anyway, the money shot from this link is (emphasis mine):

Equity prices typically fall ahead of the next recession, but the macro indictors highlighted above weaken even earlier and help distinguish a 10% correction from an oncoming bear market. On balance, these indicators are not hinting at an imminent recession; new home sales is the only potential warning flag (its most recent peak was 11 months ago) but it has the longest lead time to the next recession of all the indicators (a recent post on this is here).

As Chuck Prince, former CEO of Citigroup famously said, ““When the music stops, in terms of liquidity, things will be complicated. But as long as the music is playing, you’ve got to get up and dance. We’re still dancing.”

I guess the party’s still going strong in the U.S.

 

The New Three-Legged Retirement Stool: You, You, And You (Financial Samurai)

U.S. context but still very applicable to Singaporeans.

There used to be a lot more levers you could count on for retirement in Singapore. All civil servants used to have pensions (an auntie who’s in her late 60s was in the last batch that qualified for pensions).

Right now, I would say that Singaporeans have to rely a lot more on themselves. CPF is a decent system IF you have any money left in there after paying for your home.

If you have a big mortgage that is being paid off over the next 25-30 years, then you must hope for either (a) an increase in your pay and/or (b) an increase in home prices. That way, the burden of housing will decrease and there will be an option to cash in your home equity in your retirement years.

There is one more lever for some Singaporeans: hope that you inherit enough from your parents. For people in my students’ generation, this will be an increasingly attractive proposition as the demographics will be in their favour. Of course, this is provided there’s anything left after their parents spend on healthcare.

 

So what, we retired at the peak of the bull market? Here are seven reasons why we’re not yet worried… (Early Retirement Now)

A good take on sequence risk and it’s always good to point out that most people end up retiring at the top of the cycle. Subsequent drops in the market can cause a (temporary) drop in wealth and this may affect your standard of living in retirement.

What to do about it? Go on to the link to find out.

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