Maybe there really is a problem with millennials after all. So, this was making rounds on my Facebook feed. It’s a very long article but essentially it makes a few points:

  1. University education in Singapore is becoming more elitist with Minister Ong’s remark that university education is capped at 30-40% of each cohort.
  2. Singapore government spends a lot of money giving foreigners scholarships.
  3. Singapore’s high cost of living means that the rich (elite graduates) become richer and the poor (non-grads or grads from private universities) become poorer.

While the young people (mostly former students and some relatives) on my Facebook page share the same sentiments as the article, I think everyone in that group is missing the point about higher education.

Before I go on, I agree that the data shows that graduates have a higher starting salary than non-graduates. That, no one will dispute. Also, if you take a look at the advertisements for jobs, almost every white collar job ad out there states that a degree is a minimum requirement.

The problem is this fixation on starting salaries and the fallacy that starting salaries will remain the same should the number of graduates increase. Another problem is people thinking that things in the future will remain the same as they are now.

In the past, a degree was a pathway to acquire knowledge. Other than that, studying for a degree also meant making friends that may eventually end up in high places plus the added signalling effect that one gets from getting a degree or even better, a degree from a reputable institution. Today, with platforms like Google, Youtube, Cousera, Udemy and the likes, knowledge can easily be acquired for free or a low fee, from many other sources. That reduces the value of a degree as a signal to employees and the university as a place to network. Some may also argue that networking can easily be done online which further reinforces that the degree may be nothing more than a signal to employers.

Since the degree is now mostly used to signal to employers, any prospective undergrad must realise that the institution and course that they are taking matters a whole lot more than before. Unless one has proof that the better institutions don’t take in the best and the brightest, employers are going to assume that graduates from more reputable institutions are more desirable than others.

Is this elitist? Possibly. But the more important question should be whether this is fair. If the institution doesn’t take in the best and the brightest, then how can they justify the reputation that the awarded degree confers on the recipient? Furthermore, those who can’t handle the course probably would have spent their time better off doing something else rather waste all that time, energy and money on something they can’t handle.

At the same time, employers aren’t dumb. If there were more graduates in the job market, employers would simply respond, and some already have, by creating more stringent job interviews to ensure that they get the most suitable candidate for the job.

I’ve read arguments on why the proportion of each student cohort going on to university shouldn’t be capped and at the same time, I can understand where the government is coming from given the conservative mindset they’ve always had. I don’t think the government is being bold enough to face the future but that’s really not the point I’m trying to make here.

The point I’m trying to make is that so many young people agree with an article like the one in the link and that line of thinking makes it so easy for them to find someone or something else to blame rather than realise that the government is not and shouldn’t be the solution to everything.

Given what prospective undergrads or graduates are facing, I think the most important task at hand is to figure out what projects of value that one can do.For example, I have a student who is currently studying at a university overseas. She’s fortunate enough that her parents can pay for her education but more importantly, she realised that she loves baking and before she left for her studies, she ran a home bakery which basically meant that she had to do things like costing, inventory management, planning the logistics of

For example, I have a student who is currently studying at a university overseas. She’s fortunate enough that her parents can pay for her education but more importantly, she realised that she loves baking and before she left for her studies, she ran a home bakery which basically meant that she had to do things like costing, inventory management, planning the logistics of her bakes and delivery of her goods as well as marketing of her business.

I’ve also had a group of students who were studying for a diploma in business information technology and they took on extra work helping us create games in HTML5 that required minimal coding. However, that project taught them the value of managing a project from start to end, dealing with clients’ redos and other things that they wouldn’t have learned in class.

So, for people who think that life is unfair because you couldn’t get into a school of your choice or graduates who think that a job is at hand just because you have a relevant degree in the field, please remember that employers nowadays have look for more than just a piece of paper.

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